Re: DSM: about Sudbury model


Kristin Harkness (kristin@harkness.net)
Mon, 2 Apr 2001 15:14:55 -0400


John,

How was it that I loved it? How does one love anything? One just does!

As for a child who does not like to read, I would say, take the hint.
Apparently people fall into two categories - those who read for information
and those who read for pleasure. Your son may simply become the former,
once he has a need for it. I don't know how one becomes a reader for
pleasure, but I am pretty sure that being forced to read is not one of the
ways.

I studied math beyond calculus. I use addition, subtraction, multiplication
and division regularly and occasionally decimals, fractions and percentages.
This includes all math performed for work (software engineer). These are
not hard to learn. They are particularly easy to do (and the results are
significantly more accurate) with a calculator. If your son is not
interested in math, so what? If he likes the outdoors, perhaps he will
pursue a career in line with this interest.

Kristin
-----Original Message-----
From: John Axtell <newlife@theofficenet.com>
To: discuss-sudbury-model@aramis.sudval.org
<discuss-sudbury-model@aramis.sudval.org>
Date: Monday, April 02, 2001 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: DSM: about Sudbury model

>Kristin,
>
>Thank you for sharing your experiences. If you would answer one more
question.
>How was it that as a grade schooler you loved to read? What do you do with
a
>child that when you read to them thanks you and goes out to play and never
has
>a desire to learn to read for himself? And this goes on for year after year
>until he no longer asks you to read to him as he would simply prefer to
spend
>his life outdoors away from books and math.
>
>John



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