Re: DSM: Education/Science


Mike Sadofsky (sadofsky@mediaone.net)
Mon, 11 Dec 2000 14:58:37 -0500


Avenfeliz1@aol.com wrote:

text snipped

> Something tells me, however, that some American Indian tribes would jump at
> any chance to get out of Uncle Sam's hands, that being the public school
> system.
> That is a very interesting notion...
> Kathleen

So , what 'tells you so'? And 'why don't they'?

The Sudbury model which provides for:
freedom of activity (including efforts to avoid coercion and
coercive behaviors),
self-governance, and
adherence to the 'laws' of the political jurisdiction,
seems as if it should transcend cultural differences at
least where they are compatible with these precepts.

But the fact is that most people accept government schools
as the end of the question. They aren't looking for
alternatives, particularly 'new' alternatives and the
ability to muster the resources (people power and finances)
to begin a 'new' school that offers a model of development
that is in contrast (if not in opposition) to the prevailing
model, is a rare achievement in any society or any culture.

Most of us associated with Sudbury schools have enough to do
in maintaining our schools. Fortunately, SVS has managed to
document its philosophy and practice and create some
mechanisms to get the word out on what it is doing. The
result has been the founding of a scatter of similar schools
located in a variety of communities, none of which have
found the population ready to 'jump at the chance."

But none of these schools of which I am aware is a community
of a particularly minority ethnic majority (if that phrase
makes sense), which is, I believe, what is being suggested.
Perhaps someone who thinks this is an effort worth taking
will take it and bring the word to those communities.

Then we'll know instead of reading someone's speculations.



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