Re: DSM: Simple solution


John Axtell (newlife@theofficenet.com)
Sat, 09 Dec 2000 16:09:17 -0800


While I am quite often dumfounded by the philosophy being imposed on Sudsbury
students Robert's statement of..... "move without hesitation into continued
improvement of self as relative to a wholesome world, and cooperate with others
with charm and grace" seems to imply a definitive value system that is somehow
known by all individuals. That one would know that one is improving relative to
a wholesome world and somehow that cooperation is a behavior that should be
modeled confuses me greatly.

I need some help. Robert, or anyone else - is it the foundation of the Sudsbury
model that students are somehow born with an inherent ability to define or
recognize a "wholesome world" and that cooperation is an inherent motivation or
desire?

I was getting the idea that Sudsbury was designed to enable each individual to
define his world and values independently of a model approved by society. Am I
totally off base??

John Axtell

Robert Swanson wrote:

> A child raised by wolves would not speak, maybe not even walk. A child
> raised by nervous parents will walk and talk but may never fully understand
> peace and love and cooperation. A child raised by a loving world community
> may speak twenty languages, be in complete peace, move without hesitation
> into continued improvement of self as relative to a wholesome world, and
> cooperate with others with a charm and grace that would befuddle us lizard
> brains. This person's joy and excitement for life could power a creativity
> lightyears advanced from our own. Imagine Einstein, Jesus and Cleopatra
> holding hands as they skip down the street with the students from a Sudbury
> school. They are not going anywhere. Within, they know they have arrived.
> They found self because of who they are with.
>
> It's all a matter of models,
> robert



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