Re: Homeschooling and SVS

Tina (altsch@pacbell.net)
Wed, 20 Nov 1996 02:14:58 +0000

Hi Monica, Dale, and everyone!
Some thoughts in regard to the SVS/homeschooling/academics discussion
that might
be interesting to the group:

A year ago I opened an alternative school and was facing the issue of
whether
to follow a SVS type school model, a homeschooling model, or a more
traditional
school setting. In the past 16 years I have been involved in a variety
of
international school settings and homeschooling.

Today I provide "choices", in one "Alternative School". Parental choice
is the determining factor.

Personally, I really like the SVS model, however, similar to Dale,
professionally
(and having been educated in Europe with a high academic standard) I
needed a
curriculum, or also "giving the parents what they pay for".

1. Today I believe that the seperation of school and home is outmoded.

(I assume that SVS students do not leave "learning" in school but
continue at home.)
(And Homeschoolers might enjoy visiting a school if they have an
interest)
To choose a school is to "choose a part" of home.
My school integrates the student's home and considers the "needs" of the
individual family in choice of subjects, hours, vacations, etc.
Students often do activities at home because they enjoyed them in
school, or vise versa,
continue activites from home in school. (Homework does not exist). Home
activities as
sports, boyscouts, outings, are credited as school work and extended.

2. High academic requirements can be combined with children's natural
love
for discovery, exploration, and learning.

Academic requirements need to be explored by three instances: the
school,
the parents, and the child, unless some parents really do not want any
requirements.
Educating children is a responsibility that cannot be shifted to someone
else.
Most of the time academics can be structured to enhance a student's
interests.
(It does take a lot of effort and directly affects the teacher:student
ratio.
Some of my "teaching" materials are from Europe and a lot more
child-oriented and
creative while providing a high academic standard.
In regard to requirements I should note that children, like adults, have
days where things just do not seem to work right. And they can wait.

3. As students enter their teen years, academic requirements might be
directed
by the "job market" which adds a fourth instance. European type
apprenticeships
are a necessity for some students as much as Homeschooling, SVS type
schools,
and traditional schools.

Tina